Research Assistants

Michelle CarriganMichelle Carrigan

Michelle Carrigan received her B.A. with Honours from Cape Breton University in Nova Scotia, with a major in Political Science and a concentration in Law and Public Policy. She recently completed her Master’s in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. Her research focused on femicide in Latin America and was inspired by her time spent in El Salvador and Colombia. Supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson, she examined femicide legislation and its apparent effect on the rate of femicide in countries across the region. Michelle is currently working on various projects for the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence. 

 


 

Heather FlintoffHeather Flintoff

Heather Flintoff is a Master’s student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. She received her B.A. with Honours from Carleton University in Ottawa, with a major in Criminology and a concentration in Psychology. Supervised by Prof. Myrna Dawson, her research focuses on exploring the nature of youth-perpetrated homicide. Specifically, she will be examining how the nature of youth-perpetrated homicide in Canada has changed over time looking at variables such as motivation/circumstance, age and the offender-victim relationship. At the CSSLRV, she is working with Prof. Dawson on the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations project, a fiveyear SSHRC-funded project.


 

Grand MaisonValerie Grand Maison

Valérie Grand’Maison is a research assistant at the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence, University of Guelph, working on CSSLRV research including several research projects related to femicide/feminicide, with special emphasis on indigenous populations, as well as social network analysis of the contacts of women in situations of abuse. She obtained a Master’s degree in Global Health from Maastricht University (Netherlands) after completing her Bachelor in Psychology from McGill University (Canada). Her master’s research was conducted in Southern India, exploring the experience of women institutionalized in a psychiatric hospital. Following the completion of her Master’s degree, she worked as a research assistant at the Gender, Health and Justice Research Unit of the University of Cape Town (South Africa) where she worked on a project looking at the intersections of gender-based violence and HIV. She is particularly interested in knowledge translation (implementation science) and participative approaches to research. She would like to work with vulnerable populations in Canada and abroad. She currently aspires to develop models for intersectoral, evidence-based prevention programs and would like to pursue a career in monitoring and evaluation.


Samantha IannuzziSamantha Iannuzzi

Samantha Iannuzzi is a Master's student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. She received her B.A. with Honours from the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, majoring in Criminology and Justice and a minor in Forensic Psychology. Her research is centred on analyzing sentencing trends in the criminal justice system across Canada. Specifically, her research is focused on sentencing trends applying to Aboriginal female offenders, and how they compare to female offenders of various other ethnic backgrounds. At the CSSLRV, she is working with Dr. Dawson on the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations project, a five-year SSHRC-funded project (www.cdhpi.ca).


Samanthy MathipaskaranSamanthy Mathipaskaran

Samanthy Mathipaskaran is a Master’s student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. She received her B.A. from the University of Waterloo, majoring in Legal Studies and minoring in Political Science. Her research interests focus on racial profiling. Specifically, she would like to explore the perceptions of spatial compositions and the stigma surrounding marginalized communities in Toronto and the influence these perceptions have on policing practices. At the CSSLRV, she is working with Dr. Dawson on the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations project, a five-year SSHRC-funded project (www.cdhpi.ca).


Dylan ReynoldsDylan Reynolds

Dylan Reynolds is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Guelph. His research focuses on subjective understandings of victimization events. Specifically, his dissertation research will investigate identity theft victims’ understandings of events, institutions, and perpetrators along with the relationship between these understandings and police reporting decisions. Dylan received his B.A. and M.A. from Queen’s University, where he studied geographic variations in crime rates. Dylan’s PhD research is being supervised by Dr. Ryan Broll. At the CSSLRV, Dylan is working on the database for the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations, a five-year SSHRC funded research project, co-directed by Centre Director Myrna Dawson.


​Stephanie Rodrigues Stephanie Rodrigues 

Stephanie Rodrigues is a Master’s student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. She received her H.B.A from the University of Toronto, double majoring in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and Political Science. Her research focuses on exploring the treatment of transgender offenders in the criminal justice system. Specifically, she will be looking at the sentencing of transgender offenders in Canada to examine if judges consider one's transgender status when imposing a sentence. At the CSSLRV, she is working with Dr. Dawson on the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations project, a five-year SSHRC-funded project (www.cdhpi.ca)


Gursharan SandhuGursharan Sandhu

Gursharan Sandhu is a Master’s student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. Gursharan graduated with his B.A. from the University of Toronto (with a High Distinction Award), completing a double-specialist in Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies and Sociology. Gursharan will be examining parliamentary discussions and court decisions on violence against women, particularly for ‘honour’-based crime in Canada. His research is exploring how ‘honour’-based crime is treated in the criminal justice system and in social policy to create an evidence-based approach on how to deal with this specific type of domestic violence. At the CSSLRV, he is working with Dr. Dawson on two SSHRC-funded projects - the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations and the Geography of Justice project.