Graduate Researchers

D BaderDanielle Bader (PhD Candidate, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Danielle Bader is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on social and legal response to violence occurring within the context of intimate relationships. Danielle’s dissertation will employ intersectionality to examine how a diverse sample of female victims of domestic violence experience satisfaction with the criminal and family court systems. Danielle received her B.A. in Criminology at York University (2009) and her M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph (2015). Danielle’s Master’s thesis was part of a larger community engaged evaluation research study of a sexual assault and domestic violence protocol implemented in Guelph-Wellington to improve the local response to violence against women. Her thesis was an evaluation of the protocol from the service user perspective and examined whether the protocol improved women’s experiences with service providers upon disclosure of violence. Danielle is currently examining whether gender of the accused determines the number and type of charges laid in domestic violence cases. Danielle is working under the supervision of Dr. Myrna Dawson.

 


Ciara BoydCiara Boyd (Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph)

Ciara Boyd is a MA student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. She received an Honors B.A. from Western University with a specialization in Criminology. Her research focuses on exploring and understanding different types of mass killings. With Myrna Dawson as her supervisor, Ciara is currently comparing characteristics of mass killings that involve both family members and non-family members as victims in Ontario. She is also working on various CSSLRV-research projects, including the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative (www.cdhpi.ca), a five-year SSHRC-funded research project.

 


Michelle CarriganMichelle Carrigan  (JD Candidate, English Common Law, University of Ottawa)

Michelle Carrigan received her B.A. with Honours from Cape Breton University in Nova Scotia, with a major in Political Science and a concentration in Law and Public Policy. She recently completed her Master’s in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. Her research focused on femicide in Latin America and was inspired by her time spent in El Salvador and Colombia. Supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson, she examined femicide legislation and its apparent effect on the rate of femicide in countries across the region. Michelle is currently working on various projects for the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence. 

 


Grand MaisonValerie Grand Maison (PhD Student, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Valérie Grand’Maison is a research assistant at the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence, University of Guelph, working on CSSLRV research including several research projects related to femicide/feminicide, with special emphasis on indigenous populations, as well as social network analysis of the contacts of women in situations of abuse. She obtained a Master’s degree in Global Health from Maastricht University (Netherlands) after completing her Bachelor in Psychology from McGill University (Canada). Her master’s research was conducted in Southern India, exploring the experience of women institutionalized in a psychiatric hospital. Following the completion of her Master’s degree, she worked as a research assistant at the Gender, Health and Justice Research Unit of the University of Cape Town (South Africa) where she worked on a project looking at the intersections of gender-based violence and HIV. She is particularly interested in knowledge translation (implementation science) and participative approaches to research. She would like to work with vulnerable populations in Canada and abroad. She currently aspires to develop models for intersectoral, evidence-based prevention programs and would like to pursue a career in monitoring and evaluation.

 


Anna JohnsonAnna Johnson (PhD Student, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Anna Johnson is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on the sentencing of Indigenous offenders across Canada. Specifically, she examines whether judges consider alternatives to incarceration as instructed in the Canadian Criminal Code. For her PhD research, Anna is comparing the treatment of Indigenous peoples in specialized Indigenous Courts in Canada and Australia given that indigenous peoples are overrepresented in the prison systems in both countries. Anna received her B.A. from Nipissing University with a major in Criminal Justice and a minor in Sociology in 2014. She completed her M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph in 2016. She is the author of "Invisible No More: Sentencing Post-Gladue in Manitoba and Saskatchewan Manslaughter Cases" published in the Windsor Review of Social and Legal Issues (2016) and co-author of “Filicide" published in Oxford Bibliographies in Childhood Studies [in press]. Anna works on various projects at the Centre including two large SSHRC-funded projects: (1) the Geography of Justice; and (2) the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations. Anna's PhD research is being supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson. 

 


Danielle SuttonDanielle Sutton (PhD Candidate, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Danielle Sutton is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Guelph. While completing her undergraduate degrees in Criminal Justice and Public Policy (BAH) and Psychology (BA), she developed several broad, and overlapping research interests in the areas of policing, intimate partner violence (IPV), homicide, and sociological theory. Her MA thesis was a comparative content analysis which examined media constructions of officer-involved domestic violence (OIDV) against media representations of civilian IPV. In doing so, her research was the first to produce preliminary empirical data on OIDV in Canada while advancing literature on media constructions of IPV and media constructions of police violence. This research has been presented at both regional and international conferences. Since presenting her thesis findings at academic conferences, she has continued to attend national and international conferences presenting forthcoming work on: The characteristics of IPV incidents by relationship status, state, and length; how police homicides differ depending on whether the officer is a victim or perpetrator; and femicides of women aged 55 years and older. Her dissertation will examine the characteristics and progression of police use of deadly force in Ontario from 1985 to present day, funded by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship. Danielle also serves as a senior research assistant on various SSHRC-funded projects for the Centre, including: (1) the Geography of Justice project; and (2) the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations. Her PhD research is being supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson. 

 


Angelika ZechaAngelika Zecha (Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph)

Angelika Zecha is a Master of Arts student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. Angelika received her BA with Honours from the University of Guelph, with a major in Criminal Justice and Public Policy. Angelika’s Master’s thesis will examine whether women are more at risk of gun-related homicides as compared to men. Her research focuses on exploring the contexts of gun-related homicides involving women, and specifically will consider the role played by victim-offender relationship. At the CSSLRV, Angelika is working with Dr. Dawson on various research projects, including the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations (www.cdhpi.ca), a five-year SSHRC-funded research project