Graduate Researchers

D BaderDanielle Bader (PhD Candidate, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Danielle Bader is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on social and legal response to violence occurring within the context of intimate relationships. Danielle’s dissertation will employ intersectionality to examine how a diverse sample of female victims of domestic violence experience satisfaction with the criminal and family court systems. Danielle received her B.A. in Criminology at York University (2009) and her M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph (2015). Danielle’s Master’s thesis was part of a larger community engaged evaluation research study of a sexual assault and domestic violence protocol implemented in Guelph-Wellington to improve the local response to violence against women. Her thesis was an evaluation of the protocol from the service user perspective and examined whether the protocol improved women’s experiences with service providers upon disclosure of violence. Danielle is currently examining whether gender of the accused determines the number and type of charges laid in domestic violence cases. Danielle is working under the supervision of Dr. Myrna Dawson.


Ciara BoydCiara Boyd (Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph)

Ciara Boyd is a MA student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. She received an Honors B.A. from Western University with a specialization in Criminology. Her research focuses on exploring and understanding different types of mass killings. With Myrna Dawson as her supervisor, Ciara is currently comparing characteristics of mass killings that involve both family members and non-family members as victims in Ontario. She is also working on various CSSLRV-research projects, including the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative (www.cdhpi.ca), a five-year SSHRC-funded research project.

 


Michelle CarriganMichelle Carrigan  (JD Candidate, English Common Law, University of Ottawa)

Michelle Carrigan received her B.A. with Honours from Cape Breton University in Nova Scotia, with a major in Political Science and a concentration in Law and Public Policy. She recently completed her Master’s in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. Her research focused on femicide in Latin America and was inspired by her time spent in El Salvador and Colombia. Supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson, she examined femicide legislation and its apparent effect on the rate of femicide in countries across the region. Michelle is currently working on various projects for the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence. 

 


 

Anna JohnsonAnna Johnson (PhD Candidate, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Anna Johnson is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. Anna completed her B.A. in Criminal Justice and Sociology at Nipissing University and her M.A. at the University of Guelph in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy. For her Master’s research, she compared the sentencing of Indigenous offenders across Canada to examine how judges consider an offender’s Indigenous background and alternatives to incarceration as instructed by the Canadian Criminal Code and the Gladue decision. Anna’s SSHRC-funded dissertation research focuses on Specialized Indigenous Courts in Canada and Australia and focuses on how they attempt to incorporate Indigenous knowledge systems and Indigenous responses to transgressions into the court room. Anna is also involved in initiatives at the University of Guelph that work towards Indigenizing the academy and classroom curriculum at the college and university level. Anna works on various projects at the CSSLRV including two large SSHRC-funded projects: (1) the Geography of Justice; and (2) the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations. Anna's PhD research is being supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson.


Grand MaisonValerie Grand Maison (PhD Student, Sociology, University of Guelph)

Valérie Grand’Maison is a PhD Student in Sociology and a Research Assistant at the CSSLRV, University of Guelph. Her PhD dissertation explores the intersections of gender and disability in understanding violence, survival and resistance, and aims to use social network analysis to situate these experiences in the relationships of women with disabilities. She obtained a Master’s degree in Global Health from Maastricht University (Netherlands) after completing her Bachelor in Psychology from McGill University (Canada). Her master’s research was conducted in Southern India, exploring the experience of women institutionalized in a psychiatric hospital. Following the completion of her Master’s degree, she worked as a research assistant at the Gender, Health and Justice Research Unit of the University of Cape Town (South Africa) where she worked on a project looking at the intersections of gender-based violence and HIV. She also has experience working in disability rights as well as knowledge translation. She currently aspires to develop models for intersectoral, survivor-driven prevention and healing programs. Valérie is working on various CSSLRV research projects, including several related to femicide/feminicide.

 


 

Ana NizharadzeAna Nizharadze (Master’s Student, Political Science, University of Guelph)

Ana Nizharadze is an MA candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph as well, double majoring in Criminal Justice, Public Policy (CJPP) and Political Science. Ana’s research looks at the influence of legal and extra-legal factors on judicial decision-making at the provincial appellate court level across Canada. She is also analyzing the expanding application of the Canadian Charter of Rights of Freedoms, specifically the classification of private vs. government actors under s. 32 of the Charter. Ana is very interested in analyzing trends of homicide across Canada and in exploring ways to prevent femicide and domestic violence. She has worked with Professor Dawson on numerous research projects, both as an undergraduate and graduate student. Currently, Ana is working on two CSSLRV, SSHRC-funded projects: (1) the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations (www.cdhpi.ca); and (2) the Geography of Justice project.


Angelika ZechaAngelika Zecha (Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph)

Angelika Zecha is a Master of Arts student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. Angelika received her BA with Honours from the University of Guelph, with a major in Criminal Justice and Public Policy. Angelika’s Master’s thesis will examine whether women are more at risk of gun-related homicides as compared to men. Her research focuses on exploring the contexts of gun-related homicides involving women, and specifically will consider the role played by victim-offender relationship. At the CSSLRV, Angelika is working with Dr. Dawson on various research projects, including the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations (www.cdhpi.ca), a five-year SSHRC-funded research project